Painting Steel Doors: A Complete Guide

Are you looking revamp the steel doors in your home? Before you get out your paint brushes, there are many things you need to know. Below you’ll find a complete guide to painting steel doors that will help you get the job done.

Painting Steel Doors: A Complete Guide

Hardware has to go

You’ll need to remove the door’s hardware with a screwdriver. This includes the knob, strike plate, door knocker and kick plates. You’ll also have to remove the door from its frame and hinges. You may need a drill for that part.

Clean, tape, repair and sand

Now that you’ve removed the door, clean it with rubbing alcohol and a rag. Then, with painter’s tape, cover any areas that won’t be painted like windows and trim. If you notice any dents in the door, you can use a fibreglass compound like auto body filler to even them out. You can also use sandpaper to even out dents. Once the dents are evened out, sand the entire door. When steel doors aren’t sanded prior to being painted, the paint won’t properly adhere to the surface.

Paint once, then paint twice

If the steel door is new, you should prime it and let it dry for 24 hours. If primer is not needed you can start painting. You should apply two coats of paint. Let the first coat dry before applying the second. You can use a roller or a brush, depending on your taste. Remember to use even strokes; otherwise you’ll have paint drips and a surface that is anything but smooth. Before removing the tape, putting the door back on its hinges and re-adding the hardware, wait until it is completely dry.

When should you paint?

Painting steel doors requires the right temperature. Wait until you have a clear day with the temperature reaching at least 10 degrees Celsius. Fog, rain and cold air will take the paint longer to dry, and the moisture in the atmosphere will affect the door’s surface.

Consider the sun:

  • When steel doors are exposed to sunlight, the finish fades faster. Choose lighter colours with a hint of brown because they last longer, even after long periods of sun exposure. Darker colours, especially shades of red, will require repainting quite often.
  • Instead of traditional oil-based paint, opt for 100% acrylic paint. Acrylic paint is stronger than its oil-based counterpart when it comes to standing up to the sun.
  • If you have a storm door, it will trap heat and cause your beautiful paint job to fade quickly. If possible, leave the storm door window open to ventilate the space.

Although painting a steel door may not seem like a big job, it is. If you can, hire a professional company to paint your steel doors; otherwise you could risk doing a subpar job or becoming seriously injured.

10 Examples Of Beautiful Windows And Doors From Around The World

A windows and doors company in Europe will not offer the same designs as windows and doors manufacturers in Canada or the United States. To give you an idea of how different windows and doors look across the globe, here are 10 examples of beautiful windows and doors from around the world:

Examples Of Beautiful Windows And Doors From Around The World

  1. The Astor House in London is where you’ll find these stained glass works of art. The only downside to having incredible windows like these is you can’t exactly see out of them. But it’s a small price to pay for such beauty.
  2. It’s probably safe to say that a musician lives here. This door in Brussels, Belgium features an intricate design, although it’s unclear if the violin is real or not.
  3. This beautiful door is located in Loch Lomond, Scotland and shows that hues of blue, especially this royal one, can make any place inviting.
  4. Deep in the heart of Texas you’ll find these gorgeous arched windows. These modern windows are so big, they let in enough of that Houston sunlight that you don’t need light fixtures in the room.
  5. These artistic windows are found in a castle in Bavaria, Germany. Like the stained glass windows in the Astor House (see above), these beautiful windows are more for display than sightseeing.
  6. Designed by a custom windows and doors company in Middlebury, Vermont, these windows are perfect for the attic. They’re arched, modern and you can sit in your favourite chair, reading a good book and enjoying the sunlight they bring in.
  7. Another entry on this list from Texas is the Glory Window in the Chapel of Thanksgiving in Dallas. This eye-catching window is mesmerizing and a work of art.
  8. Kazuyuki Ishihara is one of Japan’s most influential landscape artists and designers. This garden door that he designed is so lush, you almost forget that it’s an entryway and not a magical forest.
  9. Even though Halifax is Nova Scotia’s capital, there’s no shortage of beautiful windows likes these in the heart of the city’s downtown. Plus, the exposed brick adds to the quaintness.
  10. This colourful array of windows adds to the city of Genoa, Italy’s rustic charm. Whoever the windows and doors manufacturers of these pretty windows are, they definitely know how to create enchanting designs.

4 Factors to Consider for Choosing the Right Blinds

Choosing the right window treatments can help to improve the appearance of your rooms and give you more control over the amount of light and privacy you get. Blinds are considered a “hard” window treatment in that they feature tilting slats or vanes that allow partial opening/closing using an attached, adjustable rod so you can control the view of the outside.

4 Key Considerations When Selecting Blinds For Your Windows“>

Blinds generally cover your windows in a neat and uncluttered way, but there are different options that are best for different settings. Here are some factors to consider when choosing the right blinds:

  1. Style

    Your choice of window treatment should be such that it matches your room decor. You can enhance the aesthetic appeal of your rooms by adding stylish and colourful blinds. There are different styles and colours to fit the design for your rooms. You can, for instance, choose wood blinds to give your home a natural look, or opt for a linen treatment or patterned vertical blinds for some alluring contrast and a touch of sophistication.

  2. Type of room

    There are some styles that are better suited for specific rooms in your home. For instance, bathrooms require blinds that are moisture resistant and provide sufficient privacy when closed. Studios, on the other hand, require window coverings that let in as much natural light as possible, while family rooms with children need cordless blinds for safety concerns. Also, windows that offer a scenic view require blinds that open fully, like vertical blinds, while a small kitchen window may not require any blinds.

  3. Privacy

    Windows provide a clear view of the inside and outside of your home. But when you don’t want the inside of your rooms to be visible from outside, you can choose window treatments that offer different levels of privacy and protection from potential invaders. The degree of privacy that you want is a major factor when choosing the type of blinds to buy.

  4. Lighting

    Window treatments play a big role in managing the amount of daylight that you let into your home. When choosing your blinds, you should determine how much lighting you want for the room. For instance, a room full of vintage furniture should be well protected from direct sunlight to reduce wear and tear. The right blinds should either partially filter or completely block light from getting into your home. You can opt for motorized blinds that adjust automatically throughout the day.

Lastly, you should consider the unique features of each type of blind to see if it will sufficiently address your needs. For a DIY project, you may consider mini-blinds that are easy to install, wood or aluminum blinds for their beautiful appearance, or fabric vertical blinds for privacy and filtered lighting.

Why Weatherstripping Can Save You Thousands

Weatherstripping involves sealing any air leaks in an old or drafty house. If done properly, it can cut down on your utility bills – heating and cooling – by more than 20 percent. Weatherstripping your doors and windows not only reduces your energy costs, but also reduces unnecessary wear and tear during harsh weather, saving you thousands in the long run.

Different Types Of Weatherstripping For Massive Savings

There are different types of weatherstripping that can be used to seal irregularly shaped leaks. When choosing a type of weatherstripping, you should first detect the source of air leaks and evaluate your ventilation needs to make sure you have sufficient indoor air quality. Then, you can consider other factors such as weather, wear and tear, friction, and temperature changes associated with the site that needs sealing.

For instance, when weatherstripping a window sash, you must account for the movement of sliding panes – sideways, up and down, or out. Similarly, you need to consider factors such as weatherstripping scratching your floor or getting excessive wear due to foot traffic when applies to a door threshold.

Choose the right product for each location

Some of the common weatherstripping materials include:

  • Felt: While it is one of the most cost-effective materials, felt is noticeable, susceptible to the elements, and not as efficient at blocking drafts. But its ease of application makes it a great option for low-traffic areas. For instance, it can be glued, stapled, or tacked around a door or windows.
  • Open-cell foam, or non-porous, closed-cell foam: These share the same characteristics as felt and can be placed at the top/bottom of door frames, window sashes, inoperable windows, and attic hatches. They are also great for sealing corners and irregular cracks since you can reinforce them with staples.
  • Tension seal (vinyl): Though it is slightly expensive, self-stick vinyl is sufficiently moisture resistant, holds up well, and is invisible. The material is folded along its length to create a V-shape that creates a seal when pressed against the side of a crack, like one inside the track of a sliding or double-hung window or on the top or side of a door.
  • Metals: Aluminum, copper, bronze, and stainless steel are not only affordable, but also extremely durable. These properties make them ideal for weatherstripping doors. For instance, they can be fitted onto the bottom of doors as door sweeps, door shoes, bulb thresholds, or frost-break thresholds.

You don’t necessarily have to settle on any one type of weatherstripping material. You can use different ones for irregular leaks, but prioritize durability when comparing costs to achieve the most savings in the long run.

Vinyl Vs Fibreglass: Which Is Better For You?

When it comes to improving the energy efficiency of your home, one of the most common upgrades is installing new windows. Replacement windows come in a wide range of styles, materials, glazing options, and efficiency levels, plus many manufacturers offer the option for customized windows to maximize the returns on your investment.

6 Reasons Why Fibreglass Windows Are Better Than Vinyl Windows

Among the common materials used for replacement windows, vinyl and fibreglass are the most popular options for homeowners. But which one is better for you? Here are some factors to consider:

Strength
Fibreglass is about nine times stronger than vinyl; plus, it features a narrow frame that maximizes sunlight and the outside view. This does not necessarily mean that vinyl is weak. If properly framed, vinyl windows perform fairly well.

Durability
While fibreglass and vinyl are fabricated from inert materials that do not attract insects and are resistant to the elements, they are both pretty durable. But the fact that fibreglass is a stronger material gives it a 38 per cent longer lifespan than vinyl.

In addition, vinyl windows tend to expand and contract with temperature change, which causes them to warp, crack, bow, and shrink, ultimately destroying the seal between the glass and vinyl framework. Fibreglass, on the other hand, is made from resins (silica sand) and glass fibres that are better able to withstand expansion and contraction forces without losing their integrity.

Energy Efficiency
Both options are highly energy efficient. That said, vinyl windows are designed with a number of chambers that trap air and improve the insulation properties of the frame.

Eco-Friendly
Fibreglass is made from an abundant natural resource, silica sand, that consumes much less energy during fabrication of the windows compared to vinyl windows that are fabricated from a petroleum-based plastic.

Design Customization
Vinyl windows are fairly easy to manufacture to very specific measurements, and offer a high degree of flexibility during installation so you can get an exact fit. Fibreglass, on the other hand, offers a wider range of colour options and customizable features, but it is also more labour intensive during fabrication and installation due to its rigidity, plus it requires greater precision when being fitted.

Maintenance
Vinyl windows require minimal maintenance, as they do not require painting once installed. Their corners are also welded, which reduces the risk of air leaks around the sash and frame, allowing them to maintain their efficiency for longer. But if worn or damaged, vinyl cannot be repaired; it has to replaced. Fibreglass, on the other hand, will need to be repainted, sometimes as soon as it is installed, in case the paint scratched or chipped during installation.

Verdict
Many homeowners prefer fibreglass windows for the obvious reasons – strength, durability, ability to withstand the elements, more glass real estate to let in more light, more colour options, etc. And while it costs about 10 to 30 per cent more than vinyl, a home with fibreglass windows tends to have a higher resale value than one with vinyl windows.

How Weather Affects Your Windows And Doors

Harsh weather and extreme variations in temperature can adversely affect your doors and windows, causing them to wear down faster than they should. From the scorching summer heat to gusty winds to pelting sleet and rain, any structures exposed to the elements can lose their appeal and even structural functionality owing to the regular expansion and contraction, and possible moisture absorption.

5 Kinds Of Weather Damage To Your Doors And Windows

A combination of these factors may result in:

  1. Shrinking, bowing, and warping
  2. Some materials, especially timber, are more vulnerable to humidity and extreme temperatures, causing them to lose their structural integrity. Wooden doors, door frames, and window frames that are not properly sealed tend to shrink when subjected to extreme cold and moist/dry conditions, and begin to bow or warp, losing their efficiency and ability to keep cold air out.

    To prevent this, timber surfaces should be regularly treated with sealant or paint. Aluminum and PVC are more resistant to distortion from the elements.

  3. Condensation
  4. Condensation forms when there is no room for warm air in your home to escape to the cooler outside environment, which means that your windows are energy efficient. This kind of condensation can be reduced by minimizing the humidity inside your home with a humidifier. But if the condensation forms between the panes of your double- or triple-glazed panes, you should get your windows inspected for a leak.

  5. Drafts
  6. Old and poorly fitted doorsand windows are more susceptible to damage by severe weather, causing them to become drafty. Weatherstripping can help improve their insulation capability, but it is best to consider replacing them.

  7. Hardware failure
  8. The stress from alternating hot and cold conditions, as well as ice that settles in the latches, hinges, handles, and other door and window mechanisms can cause them to become jammed or damaged. Awning and casement windows are more vulnerable because of their operating mechanism compared to sliding windows. Regular cleaning and greasing of these components can keep them functioning well for longer.

  9. Ice formation
  10. During the cold winter months, any moisture that settles in open spaces between windows and doors and the frames turns to ice, making it hard to open or close your windows and doors without damaging the weather stripping. It is important to replace weather stripping regularly to improve the energy efficiency of your doors and windows.

Final Note
You can reduce the effects of adverse weather on your doors and windows by considering their orientation with regard to the direction of the sun. Typically, western and southern exposures are harshest. If you cannot change the design of your home, consider other strategies, such as the following: using lighter paint colours to absorb less heat; installing storm doors and windows with low-E glass; and installing overhang protection.

Why It’s Important To Know Your Climate Zone Before You Buy Windows And Doors

Your local climate zone plays a vital role in many aspects of building or renovating your home, including your choice of doors and windows. You want to make your living space as comfortable as possible without having to spend too much money on energy bills – heating and cooling.

Windows And Doors Buying Guide - Know Your Climate Zone

Today, glass manufacturers try to accommodate all kinds of homeowner requests. For instance, you are likely to find windows that allow more light through, intended for homeowners who feel they need to let in more natural light into a room; or those that let in light but trap the heat inside, and just about every other need.

Research shows that windows are one of the biggest sources of heat loss in winter, especially in older homes, due to the low insulating capabilities of the windows, as well as air leakage. To make your rooms as energy efficient as possible, it is essential that you pick the right windows for your climate – those that keep heat inside in the winter and outside in the summer.

The Solution

Many windows, glazed doors, and skylights now come with labels or energy ratings, similar to those found on household appliances, to help homeowners and contractors find energy-efficient products.

According to Energy Star, Canada has three climate zones, though the largest section of the country experiences temperatures below 18 degrees Celsius for most of the year. The climate zone for which a door, window, or skylight is Energy-Star-certified will be indicated on a label on the product. So, you should know your home’s climate zone before making the purchase.

If you, instead, purchase a window that is rated for a different zone, perhaps one that is warmer than where you reside, you will find that the window is not as efficient as you expect – with somewhat poor insulation ability.

If you reside at a considerably higher elevation than the surrounding region, it is likely that your home is also cooler than those in your area. You should take this difference into consideration when purchasing products, and choose those designed for at least one level colder. This principle is particularly important for homes in central and southern British Columbia where the energy efficiency levels used are based on the large urban centres located in lower altitudes.

Final Note

In all climates, you will find that windows and doors with low U-factor perform better. Some areas in Canada experience extremely low temperatures like -30 degrees or colder.

The maximum U-factor value for the Energy Star label is 0.35. But for extreme cold conditions, it is recommended that you get windows with a U-factor of 0.17, which are typically triple-glazed, low-e coating with inert gas between the glass panes.